Quicken critical service alert

Apparently Intuit has found a good way to get Quicken customers to upgrade to the latest version – extortion. Bloating the software with new features is no longer enough to get customers to upgrade, so instead they effectively disable the software by taking away critical features, such as the ability to download transactions and balances from your financial institutions.

I recently received the email shown below that my Quicken 2010 software was expiring and “critical services” will be discontinued. I can understand canceling support and help for an older piece of software, but downloading your financial information is a major part of using Quicken. It’s like a car company trying to get you to buy a new car by taking away your power steering after three years.

Planned obsolescence is pretty common, but it’s usually achieved these days by putting out a better product that makes the product you own pale in comparison. Quicken 2010 works just fine, and the 2013 version doesn’t seem to offer anything new and worthwhile. On Amazon, it gets an average of 2.8 stars out of 5, with most reviewers giving it one star.

If feature bloat no longer does the trick, how do they get people to upgrade? Extortion and monopolizing the personal finance software market. Maybe it’s time to use something else instead. Microsoft Money? Oh yeah, that’s gone now. Mint.com maybe? Sounds good, but guess who owns Mint now? Intuit.

Oh well, I guess all I can do is give in and upgrade to 2013. At least I’ll get a $20 off coupon and free shipping. How considerate!

Quicken2013

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