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New article: Career Advice for User Researchers

I just published a new article in my Practical Usability column in UXmatters: Career Advice for User Researchers.

As I approached the ten year anniversary of my first job in usability, I started to reflect on all the things I’ve learned over the years. Originally, I was going to distill the main lessons I’d learned over those years into an article tentatively titled, “Ten things in Ten Years.” Well, I never got around to completing that article, and the ten year anniversary passed. Eventually, the idea evolved into career advice for people new to user research, and I finally got around to publishing it around my 11th anniversary in user research.

The article covers a lot of practical advice for people considering a career in user research, including the following topics:

  • Do you want to be a User Researcher, a Designer, or both?
  • Who do you want to work for?
  • What type of employee do you want to be?
  • Why type of projects do you want to work on?
  • What value does the company you’re considering place on user research?
  • Where does the company you’re considering draw the line between research and design?
  • What is the prestige and reputation of the company you’re considering?
  • Does the job title matter?
  • Where do you want to work?
  • How do you break into the field?
  • Do you need a portfolio?
  • How to cultivate your online presence.
  • What to do once you have a job.

Read the entire article at UXmatters: Career Advice for User Researchers.

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New article: Learning the Subject Matter

As a consultant, I work with many different clients from a variety of industries. My company, Electronic Ink, focuses on designing business systems, which means our projects are usually much more complex than the typical website.

My job as a design researcher is to uncover and understand the business needs and user needs. But even before beginning stakeholder interviews and user research sessions, I have to know something about the subject matter to ask the right questions and to understand what I’m hearing and observing. There is usually very little time at the beginning of a project to get up to speed on the subject matter. When the subject matter is very complex, I find that to be the most difficult part of the project.

I recently wrote an article for Johnny Holland (the interaction design blog) about this issue. Read the entire article: Learning the Subject Matter.

New article: The Ghost Hunter’s Guide to User Research

Image by Sam Breach via Flickr

What do ghost hunting and user research have in common? That’s the question I try to answer in my latest article on UXmatters: The Ghost Hunter’s Guide to User Research.

As a fan of the SyFy Network series, Ghost Hunters, I began to see parallels between the work the TAPS team did and user research. It sounds like a stretch, but there are some interesting similarities.

At first, I was a little hesitant about publishing this story and sat on it for over a year. I worried that it might be too frivolous. But as I explored the topic further, I realized this was a humorous and interesting way to look at user research, and it seemed a perfect article to publish around Halloween.
The reaction has been very positive. I expected my article to be read by the user experience community, but I was surprised to see the attention it has received from the paranormal/ghost hunting world as well.

Read the entire article at UXmatters: The Ghost Hunter’s Guide to User Research.

New Article: Client Reactions to User Research Findings

As a design researcher, I’ve heard a lot of reactions from clients about the user research findings, both positive and negative. Fortunately, they’ve been mostly positive, but the negative reactions make for the best stories. I’ve written about those in my latest article in UXmatters: Client Reactions to User Research Findings. It includes the following reactions:

  • “Ho hum. Where are the designs?”
  • “We already knew that.”
  • “You’re wrong!”
  • “You talked with only 12 people.”
  • “Why didn’t you mention this problem?”
  • “The recommendations aren’t specific enough.”
  • “We could have done that ourselves.”

Read the entire article at UXmatters: Client Reactions to User Research Findings.