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Archive for September, 2011

Attend a Conference

CHI 2012, Interaction 12, IA Summit 2012, and UPA 2012It’s conference season again. The time is approaching to submit proposals to present at the major user experience conferences for 2012. Submissions for CHI 2012 are open, and the UPA 2012 and IA Summit calls for presentations are coming soon. If you’re just interested in attending, registration for most of these conferences is months away. But it’s still a good time to start looking into conferences you want to attend and to prepare to convince your employer to pay for them.

After not attending conferences for a few years, due to the recession, I attended and presented at UPA 2011 this year. I learned a few things, caught up with former colleagues, met some new people, and rekindled my passion and interest in user experience. It was a great experience that reminded me of the many benefits of attending conferences.

Benefits of presenting at a conference

Even better than attending a conference is presenting, which provides a number of benefits.

  • You get to contribute and share your knowledge with the user experience community.
  • It increases your visibility in the field, and people think of you as an expert on the subject you present.
  • It looks impressive on a resume.
  • It’s impressive to people in your company and to clients.
  • It’s a good way to network and meet others. People who attend your session often come up to you afterwards to ask questions and to talk about your topic.
  • It’s a good ego boost. You feel good that so many people are interested in what you have to say and in getting your feedback. It builds confidence and makes you want to speak again.
  • You often get free or discounted conference registration. And most companies are more likely to pay to send you to a conference if you are presenting rather than just attending.

Benefits of attending a conference

Whether you present or not, there are also many benefits of attending a conference.

  • You learn new things. Regardless of how many years of experience you have, at a good conference, you learn a few new tips and techniques. As an experienced professional, you may have less to learn than someone new to the field, but I find that I pick up at least a few new things that I may not have thought of on my own.
  • You hear new perspectives. Working with the same people all the time, it’s easy to get caught up in your usual way of doing things and to forget that there are alternatives. Conferences are a great way to hear how people at other companies approach problems differently. You may not always agree, but it’s interesting to hear other viewpoints and methods that you wouldn’t normally hear.
  • You get inspired. Taking a break from your normal work routine and surrounding yourself with a roomful of user experience people talking about important issues in the field is inspiring. I find that a good conference is rejuvenating and recaptures the interest that I had when I first started in the field.
  • It’s a great place to network. User experience is a small field. You often run into the same people that you’ve met at previous events, former coworkers, and clients. Since so much networking is done on social media these days, a conference is the place to finally meet people in person.
  • It helps your career. A conference is a great way to see what other companies are out there, what other people are doing, to see who is hiring, to network with those who are hiring, and to even interview for jobs. Most conferences facilitate job hunters and companies looking to hire with job boards and interviews at the conference.

Event listings

If I’ve inspired you to speak at or attend a conference, the following sites seem to have the best listings of user experience events:

Find UX Events

Lanyrd

HCI Bibliography Events Calendar

Johnny Holland Calendar


How Effective are Incentives for Online Card Sorting?

Unmoderated card sorting tools are a great way to reach a large number of geographically dispersed participants for your card sorting study. With mass emails you can reach a large number of potential participants, but the challenge is getting people to participate in the study. Unfortunately, few people actually open and read these emails, and even fewer take the time to participate in the study.

Email invitation to an online card sorting study

How do you motivate people to participate?

So how do you motivate people to participate in Web-based card sorting or another type of unmoderated, remote user research study? Incentives! But what type of incentive works best for a mass audience? You can give an incentive to each participant, but with a large number of participants that can be very expensive. And if you give each participant a small incentive of say $5.00, how motivating is that?

A common alternative is using a sweepstakes-style drawing. One of the participants out of hundreds will get a gift card or other incentive. But how effective is this sweepstakes-style incentive in increasing the number of participants? Does it affect the quality of the results by encouraging those who are only interested in the incentive and not in completing the study seriously?  Can you motivate people to participate in a study without any incentive? What are the other variables that affect participation?

Read more

What to Do When You Have Nothing to Do

There’s definitely a sweet spot in terms of the amount of work you do. Ideally, you have enough work to keep you busy, enough variety to keep you interested, and enough time to do quality work, without sacrificing your personal life to meet deadlines.

But for most people, there are times when work slows down. At first it’s nice to have a break for a few days after being incredibly busy. You catch up on emails, read articles that you’ve been meaning to look at, file expense reports, clean up the piles of paper on your desk, and other administrative things. However, too many days with nothing to do can be unnerving. At first, you may begin to feel restless and bored. The days crawl by. After a few more days, you may begin to question your worth and feel guilty about having nothing to do.

It doesn’t have to be that way. There are a number of things to keep you busy when things slow down at work. These things will make you feel useful and give you a sense of purpose, will make your employer think that you’re doing something useful, and will help your career.

Learn something new

Especially in the field of technology, you never stop learning. No matter how experienced you are, there’s always something new to learn. It’s important to keep your knowledge up to date with new developments in your field. That’s hard to do when you’re busy. So down times are the perfect time to catch up on your learning. This can take several forms:

  • Read articles in professional journals, online magazines, blogs, and other Web sources. If you follow the right people, Twitter is a great source of links to the most interesting and relevant user experience articles.
  • Research other user experience methods, technologies, and processes you can use. Look into new research and design tools.
  • Catch up on the latest user experience books. If you haven’t looked at what’s out there in a while, you’ll be surprised by the number of new books. Look on Amazon or publishers’ sites, like Rosenfeld Media. But be careful not to read a book at work. That makes it a little too obvious that you’re not doing real work.
  • Attend professional training.
  • Do Web-based training through an online source such as Lynda.com.
  • Look into conferences that you might want to attend, and use this time to write up a justification of the benefits of attending to convince your company to pay for it.
  • Conduct your own research study in an area that interests you.

Share your knowledge

A lot of people overlook the fact that they have a lot of knowledge and experiences to share with others. When you’re not busy, it’s a great time to reflect back on your work and write down your insights and experiences from your recent projects. Many of us don’t do this because we think we don’t have anything interesting to say that hasn’t already been said before. But if you sit down and brainstorm, you’ll be surprised how much you have to contribute. Some ways to share your knowledge with others are:

  • Write a blog.
  • Write articles for online magazines such as UXmatters, Johnny Holland, Boxes and Arrows, etc.
  • Write articles for professional journals or association magazines.
  • Prepare a paper, presentation, panel, tutorial, or workshop for a conference.
  • Present at a local professional association meeting like CHI or UPA local chapters.
  • Present to an internal group within your company.

Work for yourself

When you’re not working on other people’s stuff, work for yourself. Most of the learning and sharing activities I listed above will boost your career, but here are a few additional things you can do. Be careful about doing these things at work, however.

  • Document the work you’ve done by working on your portfolio, preparing case studies (for your company or for yourself), and created scrubbed work samples to remove client confidential material.
  • Manage your Twitter profile: look into additional people to follow, look through the list of people you currently follow and determine if there are some less useful people you should remove, and do some tweeting yourself.
  • Review your LinkedIn profile and update it. If you haven’t looked at LinkedIn in a while, there are many new features you can add to your profile. See if there are more people you should connect with. Write recommendations for people you think really deserve it.
  • Look into other professional associations you can join and local events you can attend. If you’re really ambitious, you can look into ways to volunteer in local and national associations, such as organizing and helping run events.

These things can keep you busy, make you feel useful, and are a good way to keep your skills sharp and advance your career during what could otherwise be a boring and painfully slow period. When the work eventually picks up again, you’ll be glad that you used you free time wisely.

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